Not-so-Signpost: The Haunting of Hank

Rebecca Baggett

A mysterious reflection was seen in the pond in Lindquist Plaza on the evening of March 25. The reflection appeared to be in the shape of a moose, yet no moose were seen.

The ghost of Hank the moose wades in the pond at Weber State University. Photo by Benjamin Zack, photoshoped by Kennedy Robins. (Kennedy Robins/ The Signpost)
The ghost of Hank the moose wades in the pond at Weber State University. Photo by Benjamin Zack, photoshopped by Kennedy Robins. Photo credit: Kennedy Robins

Tom Ato, a student at Weber State, saw the reflection and claimed to also see a clear shadow.

“I thought I saw a large four-legged creature, but I could see straight through the shape. It must not have really been there.”

Several others on campus that evening reported seeing a shadowy figure in different places on campus. After hearing the mumblings of the supposed shadow, Fiddleford McGucket, assistant professor of supernatural studies, proposed a theory that it must be the ghost of Hank the moose. McGucket has 20 years of experience in the field of paranormal activity.

Hank, the ghost McGucket refers to, is the moose that was seen on Weber State’s Ogden campus in September 2021. Articles by The Signpost and other local media outlets reported the moose exploring the pond by Lindquist plaza, similar to the reflection that was seen on Friday. Hank, unfortunately, died the same day he arrived on campus after being hit by a car on Harrison Boulevard while trying to cross.

“Spirits often return to the area where they spent time or even the place where they died,” McGucket said. “Sometimes they do not realize they have died and continue their normal activities as if they were alive.”

The ghost of Hank the moose wades in the WSU pond. Photo by Benjamin Zack, edited by Kennedy Robins. (Kennedy Robins/ The Signpost)
The ghost of Hank the moose revisits the WSU pond. Photo by Benjamin Zack, edited by Kennedy Robins. Photo credit: Kennedy Robins

On March 27, to address the growing public concern about the events, WSU brought in two professional ghost hunters, Jack Daniels and Robert De Niro, as well as local energy reader Juniper Tree. Daniels and De Niro brought their equipment to scan the area and a heat energy finder to locate the reflection in the pond, but no images were provided for publication.

The second device they used to locate the spirit resembled a cable dish.

“This radar uses echolocation. It was modeled after a bat’s echolocation. It produces a small high pitched sound, and if there is an energy or being within a 20 radius, the sound waves ricochet and return to the dish,” Daniels said.

Utilizing this technology, Daniels and De Niro were able to confirm the presence of a large animal spirit. As to what should be done, authorities then turned to Tree.

“The spirit’s energy is not coarse and it is not aggressive. If we do not bother it, it will not bother us,” Tree said.

At this time, WSU officials do not see Hank’s ghost as a threat and have chosen to let him roam the campus freely.