Biden and Trump’s possible paths to the presidency

Daryn Steed

President Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are locked in a heated battle for the presidency.

This combination of pictures created on October 22 shows US President Donald Trump and Democratic Presidential candidate and former US Vice President Joe Biden during the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on October 22. (Brendan Smialowski and Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)
This combination of pictures created on October 22 shows US President Donald Trump and Democratic Presidential candidate and former US Vice President Joe Biden during the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on October 22. (Brendan Smialowski and Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)

As of Nov. 4, both nominees have plausible paths to win office. Biden currently leads with 248 electoral votes to Trump’s 214.

Nevada, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Georgia and Alaska have yet to be called, according to the Associated Press.

Biden has a lead in Nevada. If he holds that lead, he will win the election by a slim margin.

Trump needs to flip Nevada, along with maintaining his leads in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Alaska and Georgia.

Assuming none of these states flip, Biden will win with 270 electoral votes to Trump’s 268.

Unlike the slim margin of electoral votes, Biden has broken the record for most popular votes ever received by a president with a current 73,142,52, according to CBS. Trump has received 69,203,405 votes, which is on the verge of President Obama’s record in the 2008.

Trump has already announced he will ask for a recount in Wisconsin, where Biden leads by approximately 20,000 votes. Trump’s campaign sued Pennsylvania and Michigan to halt counting votes, according to the Associated Press.

On Nov. 3, with millions of votes left to be counted, Trump’s campaign declared victory. At that point, Trump was leading in Michigan and Wisconsin. Both states flipped early the next morning.

Biden made a speech in the afternoon of Nov. 4 assuring voters his campaign had not conceded. He did not declare victory, but said his team had confidence.

“We believe when the count is finished, we’ll be the winner,” Biden said.