Seven constitutional amendments, many possible outcomes

Jennifer Greenlee

Davis County Library ballot dropbox. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)

Constitutional Amendment A:

Constitutional Amendment A would change the gendered language in the Utah Constitution to language that includes more than one gender. This includes changing “men” to “person.”

This amendment was sponsored by Deidre Henderson, a Republican Senator from Spanish Fork. If approved on the ballot, the changes would officially take effect on Jan. 1, 2021.

Amendment A was officially declared on Nov. 5 with 58 percent of the vote “for” the amendment.

Constitutional Amendment B:

Constitutional Amendment B would change how the Utah legislator qualifications are defined in the Utah constitution. Currently, the qualifications stipulate that a candidate must be a U.S. citizen, 25-years-old and qualified to vote in their district.

The amendment would specify that the age qualification would need to be met by the time a candidate would be elected and not when they file.

Amendment B was officially declared on Nov. 3 with 80.1 percent of the vote “for” the amendment.

Constitutional Amendment C:

Constitutional Amendment C would remove the provision that currently allows slavery as punishment for a crime. The amendment passed unanimously, and the amendment will not affect any current prison operations.

Amendment C was officially declared on Nov. 3 with 81.1 percent of the vote “for” the amendment.

Constitutional Amendment D:

Constitutional Amendment D would allow municipality to to supply water to other municipalities outside of their own boundaries. This is mean to clear up constitutional language on whether or not it is allowed. Senate Bill 17 and House Bill 31 accompany the amendment.

Amendment D was officially declared on Nov. 4 with 61 percent of the vote “for the amendment.

Constitutional Amendment E:

Constitutional Amendment E would guarantee the right to hunt and fish in Utah. The amendment also revises language to establish that public hunting and fishing would be the preferred way to manage wildlife.

Amendment E was officially declared on Nov. 3 with 74.2 percent of the vote “for” the amendment.

Constitutional Amendment F:

Constitutional Amendment F would revise when the legislative session would start in January. Currently, the Utah constitution states that the legislative session begins on the fourth Monday of January. Amendment F would allow legislators to pick any day in January to begin the session.

Amendment F was officially declared early on Nov. 4 with 66.8 percent of the “for” vote.

Constitutional Amendment G:

Constitutional Amendment G would change how income tax revenue could be used. The Utah constitution currently limits the use of income tax revenue to education funding only.

Amendment G expands allowed spending to included social services for children and individuals with disabilities.

Amendment G has not been declared to have passed on the ballot.

This story will be updated throughout the week as races are called.